ARTICLE XL.

Each bill which shall have passed both houses of the general assembly shall be presented to the governor. If he shall approve, he shall sign and transmit it to the secretary of the state, but if he shall disapprove, he shall transmit it to the secretary with his objections, and the secretary shall thereupon return the bill to the house in which it originated, with the governor's objections, which shall be entered on the journal of the house, which shall proceed to reconsider the bill. If, after such reconsideration, that house shall again pass it, it shall be sent with the objections to the other house, which shall also reconsider it. If approved, it shall be a law and be transmitted to the secretary; but in such case the votes of both houses shall be determined by yeas and nays and the names of the members voting for and against the bill shall be entered on the journal of each house respectively. In case the governor shall not transmit the bill to the secretary, either with his approval or with his objections, within five calendar days, Sundays and legal holidays excepted, after the same shall have been presented to him, it shall be a law at the expiration of that period unless the general assembly shall then have adjourned sine die, in which case the bill shall be a law unless the governor shall, within fifteen calendar days after the same shall have been presented to him, transmit it to the secretary with his objections, in which case it shall not be a law.
Bills may be presented to the governor after the adjournment sine die of the general assembly, and the general assembly may by law consistent with this amendment regulate the time and method of performing all ministerial acts necessary or incidental to the administration of this amendment. This amendment shall not impair the powers granted to the governor by Article XXXVII of the amendments to the Constitution.

       


ARTICLE XLI.

Article XXVI of the Amendments to the Constitution is amended to read as follows: The judges of the supreme court of errors, of the superior court and of the courts of common pleas shall, upon nomination of the governor, be appointed by the general assembly in such manner as shall by law be prescribed.

       


ARTICLE XLII.

If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the governor, the governor-elect shall have died or shall have failed to qualify, the lieutenant-governor-elect may qualify as governor, and, upon so qualifying, shall become governor. The general assembly may by law provide for the case in which neither the governor-elect nor the lieutenant-governor-elect shall have qualified, by declaring who shall, in such event, act as governor or the manner in which the person who is so to act shall be selected, and such person shall act accordingly until a governor or a lieutenant-governor shall have qualified.

       


ARTICLE XLIII.

The salary of members of the general assembly shall be six hundred dollars for the term for which they are elected.

       


ARTICLE XLIV.

Article XXI of the amendments to the constitution is amended to read as follows: Judges of probate shall be elected by the electors residing in their respective districts on the Tuesday after the first Monday of November, 1950, and quadrennially thereafter, and shall hold office for four years from and after the Wednesday after the first Monday of the next succeeding January.

       


ARTICLE XLV.

SECTION 1. A general election for governor, lieutenant-governor, secretary, treasurer and comptroller shall be held on the Tuesday after the first Monday of November, 1950, and quadrennially thereafter.
SEC. 2.
Said officers shall hold their respective offices from the Wednesday following the first Monday of the January next succeeding their election until the Wednesday following the first Monday of the fifth January succeeding their election and until their successors are duly qualified.

       


ARTICLE XLVI.

SECTION 1. The general assembly shall by law prescribe the offenses on conviction of which the privileges of an elector shall be forfeited and the conditions on which and methods by which such rights may be forfeited.
SEC. 2.
Section three of article sixth of the constitution and article XVII of amendments to the constitution are repealed.

       


ARTICLE XLVII.

The judges of minor courts, including town, city, borough and police courts, shall, upon nomination by the governor, be appointed by the general assembly for such term and in such manner as shall be by law prescribed.




Note: Effective January 1, 1955, the preceding 47 amendments were incorporated into the text of the Connecticut Constitution. Subsequent to that date, 12 additional amendments were adopted and they follow:




Amendments to the Constitution of Connecticut (1818)



ARTICLE I.

SEC. 1. Whenever a majority of the house of representatives shall deem it necessary to alter or amend this constitution, they may propose such alterations and amendments, which proposed amendments shall be continued to the next general assembly and be published with the laws which may have been passed at the same session; and if two-thirds of each house, at the next session of said assembly, shall approve the amendments proposed, by yeas and nays, said amendments shall, by the secretary, be transmitted to the town clerk in each town in this state, whose duty it shall be to present the same to the inhabitants thereof, for their consideration, at a town meeting, legally warned and held for that purpose; and if it shall appear, in a manner to be provided by law, that a majority of the electors present and voting on such amendments at such meetings shall have approved such amendments, the same shall be valid, to all intents and purposes, as a part of this constitution.

SEC. 2. Article eleventh of the constitution is repealed.

       


ARTICLE II.

SEC. 1. No member of the general assembly shall, during the term for which he is elected, hold or accept any appointive position or office in the judicial or executive departments of the state government, or in the courts of the political subdivisions of the state, or in the government of any country. No member of congress, no person holding any office under the authority of the United States and no person holding any office in the judicial or executive department of the state government or in the government of any county shall be a member of the general assembly during his continuance in such office.

SEC. 2. Section 6 of Article tenth of the constitution is repealed.

       


ARTICLE III.

SEC. 1. Article tenth of the constitution is amended by adding section 7 as follows: Claims against the state shall be resolved in such manner as may be provided by law.

       


ARTICLE IV.

SEC. 1. Section 15 of Article third of the constitution is amended to read as follows: The salary of members of the general assembly and the transportation expenses of its members in the performance of their legislative duties shall be determined by law.

       


ARTICLE V.

Article I of the amendments to the constitution is amended by adding thereto the following: Sec. 3. For purposes of section 1 of this article, electors voting by absentee ballot under the provisions of the statutes shall be considered to be present and voting.

       


ARTICLE VI.

Section 4 of Article Sixth is amended to read as follows: The qualifications of electors shall be decided at such times and in such manner as may be prescribed by law.

       

ARTICLE VII.

In the election of governor and lieutenant-governor, voting for said offices shall be as a unit. The name of no candidate for either office, nominated by a political party or by petition, shall appear on the voting machine ballot labels except in conjunction with the name of the candidate for the other office.

       

ARTICLE VIII.

Any person admitted as an elector in any town shall, if he removes to another town, have the privileges of an elector in such other town after residing therein for six months. The general assembly shall prescribe by law the manner in which evidence of the admission of an elector and of the duration of his current residence shall be furnished to the town to which he removes.

       


ARTICLE IX.

The general assembly may by law provide for the admission as electors in absentia of members of the armed forces, the United States merchant marine, members of religious or welfare groups or agencies attached to and serving with the armed forces and civilian employees of the United States, and the spouses and dependents of such persons.

       


ARTICLE X.

Section 1 of Article I of the Amendments to the Constitution is amended to read as follows: Whenever a majority of the total membership of the house of representatives shall deem it necessary to alter or amend this constitution, they may propose such alterations and amendments, which proposed amendments shall be continued to the next general assembly and be published with the laws which may have been passed at the same session; and if two-thirds of the membership present of each house, at the next session of said assembly, shall approve the amendments proposed, by yeas and nays, said amendments shall, by the secretary, be transmitted to the town clerk in each town in this state, whose duty it shall be to present the same to the inhabitants thereof, for their consideration, at a town meeting, legally warned and held for that purpose; and if it shall appear, in a manner to be provided by law, that a majority of the electors present and voting on such amendments at such meetings shall have approved such amendments, the same shall be valid, to all intents and purposes, as a part of this constitution.

       


ARTICLE XI.

Section 1 of Article Sixth is amended to read as follows: Every citizen of the United States who has attained the age of twenty-one years, who has resided in the town in which he offers himself to be admitted to the privileges of an elector at least six months next preceding the time he so offers himself, who is able to read in the English language any article of the constitution or any section of the statutes of this state, and who sustains a good moral character, shall, on his taking such oath as may be prescribed by law, be an elector.

       


ARTICLE XII.

SECTION 1. The general assembly may provide by law for voting in the choice of any officer to be elected or upon any question to be voted on at an election by qualified voters of the state who are unable to appear at the polling place on the day of election because of absence from the city or town of which they are inhabitants or because of sickness or physical disability or because the tenets of their religion forbid secular activity.

SEC. 2. Section 6 of Article Sixth of the constitution is repealed.

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